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Dealing with Codecs for Adobe Premiere Pro – FAQ: Import video to Adobe Premiere Pro

In this article we’ll take at look at some popular codecs and see how to import and work with them in Adobe Premiere Pro. Finally, we’ll look at some common errors and glitches, and how to troubleshoot them.

How to import video with different codecs to Adobe Premiere Pro?
There are many codecs and container options out there. Just when you think you have a handle on things, a new codec is announced. It’s a way of life, which is unlikely to be ‘corrected’ soon.
You always have to stay ahead of the game. Let’s look at a few codecs and how to deal with them.

H.264
H.264 is the ubiquitous codec, and it looks like it will stay for quite some time. Adobe Premiere Pro supports H.264 natively, via either of the convert canon mxf to h.264 video to adobe premiere pro.
For more information on shooting with DSLR footage, read the Adobe DSLR Workflow Guide.
H.264 – ALL-I
The ‘new’ entrant to the H.264 family is just an interpretation of the codec with interframe turned off. Adobe Premiere Pro supports it natively.
AVCHD
AVCHD is a ‘version’ of the MPEG-4 AVC specification, or H.264, and Adobe Premiere Pro supports it natively via either of the import methods mentioned with best AVCHD Video Converter.
XDCAM
Sony codecs do find their way into Adobe Premiere Pro, but always ‘one step behind’, if you know what I mean. Now that Adobe Premiere Pro supports all versions of XDCAM (EX and HD) natively, Sony has moved on, so to speak.
Make sure you copy all the files in the media card folder to your source footage drive, keeping the folder name and structure intact.
An advanced workflow (like using Gamma, etc.) is beyond the scope of this article, but you can start by reading the excellent Adobe XDCAM Workflow Guide.
XAVC
Sony’s new baby codec, is supported by Adobe Premiere Pro natively, albeit with a $350 third-party plugin from MainConcept (now part of Rovi): the Rovi TotalCode Plug-in.
Caveat: If you want to use the plug-in, I highly recommend you don’t use the trial version. The trial version lets you test XAVC with a watermark, plus it watermarks a few other existing codecs as well!
CANON XF (MXF)
This applies to files from both the XF series cameras as well as the Cinema EOS line (Cxxx). Make sure you copy all the files in the media card folder.
Adobe Premiere Pro supports it natively via either of the import methods mentioned in This. To know how to work with Log Gamma and other tricky stuff, I recommend you read the Canon XF Ultility vs Video Converter Guide.
Panasonic P2 MXF
Adobe Premiere Pro supports it natively via either of the import methods mentioned in This. To know how to work with Log Gamma and other tricky stuff, I recommend you read the MXF Video Converter for Mac or MXF Converter for Windows.
HDV and DV
HDV is still supported natively, in both transport stream form as well as wrapped as MOV, etc.
Of course, you can also Capture HDV from a camera or tape deck directly. For DV and HDV, this method is preferable over Import… since you will also get important metadata and timecode this way (if the camera supplies it).
REDCODE RAW R3D/RMD
Adobe Premiere Pro supports Redcode RAW natively. All resolutions, compression levels and ‘Gammas’ are supported.
You can use RedCine-X to save files as .RMD, and import them into Premiere Pro. A full workflow is beyond the scope of this article, but Adobe has an excellent Red Workflow Guide.
ARRIRAW
Adobe Premiere Pro supports Arriraw (.ARI) natively via either of the import methods mentioned in here.
Since .ARI files are saved as single frames (sort of like Cinema DNG), you might try to import them as image sequences, but this isn’t necessary. Just import the first frame in each folder (make sure you copy all the files from the media drive) and Premiere Pro does the rest. These files are treated as ‘spanned clips’.
Arriraw is extremely tough on the system, and on average, I’ve noticed scrubbing and playback is tougher. E.g., if Red 5K can be scrubbed or played back at 1/2 resolution, then Arriraw will need 1/4. The funny thing is, if you reduce the resolution of 5K to 1/4, the resulting image is still good on a 1080p monitor. The same can’t be said of 2.5K Arriraw, or 1080p material in general.
HDCAM SR (SStP)
This codec is not supported natively. You’ll have to transcode to Prores, etc. Now that Sony has brought this codec back (in a tape-less version), we might see native support in the next update. But don’t hold your breath.
MPEG-4
Adobe Premiere Pro supports MPEG-4 (.MP4) natively.
X.264
X.264 is not supported by Adobe Premiere Pro unless you rewrap it into a MOV container with the Quicktime player installed. One plug-in that you can use is X264Pro, but it costs $300 or so.
You could also try the FFMPEG command-line tool to rewrap files.
PRORES
As long as you have Quicktime installed, Adobe Premiere Pro supports Prores (.MOV) and most Quicktime codecs natively. No transcoding or rewrapping necessary.
DNxHD
Adobe Premiere Pro does not support DNxHD natively, unless it is rewrapped in a MOV Container with the Avid Codec Pack and Quicktime installed.
DNxHD MXF files will need to be transcoded or rewrapped with third-party software before import. You can choose this MXF Video Converter (Windows & Mac)
DPX
Adobe Premiere Pro supports both Log and Linear DPX sequences via either of the import methods mentioned in Part One.

IMAGE SEQUENCES – TIFF, JPEG, PSD, ETC.
Adobe Premiere Pro supports image sequences (8-bit and 16-bit, compressed and uncompressed, with an alpha channel) via either of the import methods mentioned in Part One.
You only have to select the first image/frame in the folder, and tick the box that says Image Sequence. Make sure they are numbered correctly in sequence.

March 30, 2014 This post was written by Categories: Convert MXF to Adobe Premiere CC/CS7Convert MXF to Adobe Premiere CS 5Convert MXF to Adobe Premiere CS 6Convert MXF to Adobe Premiere ElementsMXF Video Converter for MacMXF Video Converter for Windows Tagged with:
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